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When it comes to strengthening the public sector, a creative Government needs to look inward for new ways to achieving better results for the people they serve. One promising tool that has gained momentum across numerous sectors in the last few years is the adoption of feedback mechanism.

That is, systematically collecting information, and learning from the public and workforce insights, can greatly benefit government across all board.

The collection of these valuable insight, and acting on them, remains an underutilised tool in government today.

While the private sector has used customer feedback to improve products and services, the government and nonprofit sectors have often lagged behind. No doubt, the people we serve remained a critically important factor in driving positive outcomes.

Narayana Murthy, an Indian IT industrialist and Co-founder of Infosys talked much about the power of feedback. Narayana wrote: “The biggest Instrument for improvement for leaders is feedback. Most leaders who failed in the world today, failed because they cut off the feedback channel. They allowed only positive signals to come to them. Whether it was Mrs. Indira Gandhi, whether it was Richard Nixon, whether it was Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe or Dr. Goodluck Jonathan in Nigeria, everyone of these people, cut off the feedback channel. Therefore, every leader need to create an environment where people give honest feedback, and if you use that feedback, when you sit alone as a leader, you reflect and act on them. I think there is an opportunity for every leader to improve.”

In a nutshell, getting honest feedback from service recipients can help government and its agencies at all levels to improve on their performances and ensure their work effectively addresses the needs of the people they serve.

It’s equally important to close the loop by letting those who provided feedback know that their input was put to good use.

When it comes to strengthening the public sector, a creative Government needs to look inward for new ways to achieving better results for the people they serve. One promising tool that has gained momentum across numerous sectors in the last few years is the adoption of feedback mechanism.

That is, systematically collecting information, and learning from the public and workforce insights, can greatly benefit government across all board.

The collection of these valuable insight, and acting on them, remains an underutilised tool in government today.

While the private sector has used customer feedback to improve products and services, the government and nonprofit sectors have often lagged behind. No doubt, the people we serve remained a critically important factor in driving positive outcomes.

Narayana Murthy, an Indian IT industrialist and Co-founder of Infosys talked much about the power of feedback. Narayana wrote: “The biggest Instrument for improvement for leaders is feedback. Most leaders who failed in the world today, failed because they cut off the feedback channel. They allowed only positive signals to come to them. Whether it was Mrs. Indira Gandhi, whether it was Richard Nixon, whether it was Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe or Dr. Goodluck Jonathan in Nigeria, everyone of these people, cut off the feedback channel. Therefore, every leader need to create an environment where people give honest feedback, and if you use that feedback, when you sit alone as a leader, you reflect and act on them. I think there is an opportunity for every leader to improve.”

In a nutshell, getting honest feedback from service recipients can help government and its agencies at all levels to improve on their performances and ensure their work effectively addresses the needs of the people they serve.

It’s equally important to close the loop by letting those who provided feedback know that their input was put to good use.